This page discusses AVCV's program requesting that local jurisdictions in Arizona provide crime victims with a free copy of their police report.

 

This page contains the following information:

Table Listing Cities that provide a victim a free report

Relevant Arizona Constitution section

ARS Definition of "victim"

Relevant ARS Statutes regarding Public Records

Uniform Crime Reporting - Definitions

Note: the following crimes are all part one crimes, we include the definitions for your information.

    Part I - Violent
        Violent Crime
        Murder
        Robbery
        Forcible Rape
        Aggravated Assault

    Part I - Property
        Property Crime
        Arson
        Burglary
        Larceny-Theft
        Vehicle Theft
 

 

Table Listing Cities that provide a victim a free report

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Jurisdiction

Current Policy

Apache Junction

Part One Crimes

Avondale

Part One Crimes

Buckeye

Part One Crimes, plus all domestic violence

Casa Grande

All Crimes

Chandler

All Crimes plus death reports

DPS

Assault, DV or serious injury/death resulting from accident

Flagstaff Homicide, Rape, Robbery, Aggravated Assault and all death reports are provided for free to victims or their family members.

Fountain Hills

All Crimes

Gilbert

All Crimes

Glendale

Part One Crimes

Lake Havasu City

Formal policy Part One Crimes, informal policy all crime victims

Mesa

All Crimes

Paradise Valley

Part One Crimes

Payson

Part One Crimes

Peoria

Part One Crimes - must request within one year of offense

Phoenix

Part One Crimes

Prescott

All Crimes

Prescott Valley

Part One Crimes

Safford

All Crimes

Scottsdale

All Crimes

Sedona

Homicide/unattended deaths, sex & agg. Assault, and traffic accidents resulting in serious injury or death.

Tempe

Part One Crimes

Tucson

Part One Crimes

Yuma

Part One Crimes, Plus Domestic Violence with injuries

 

 

The Arizona Constitution, Victims' Bill of Rights states:

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"Section 2.1. (A) To preserve and protect victims' rights to justice and due process, a victim of crime has a right:

 

1. To be treated with fairness, respect, and dignity, and to be free from intimidation, harassment, or abuse, throughout the criminal justice process.

 

 7. To read pre-sentence reports relating to the crime against the victim when they are available to the defendant."

 

Definition of a victim as defined by Arizona Statute: http://www.azleg.state.az.us/ars/13/04401.htm

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19. "Victim" means a person against whom the criminal offense has been committed, or if the person is killed or incapacitated, the person's spouse, parent, child or other lawful representative, except if the person is in custody for an offense or is the accused.

 

NOTE: The above definition was modified by the Legislature and Signed into law by the Governor in 2001.  "Spouse, parent, child" has been replaced with "immediate family," which is a legal definition that includes: "spouse, parent, child, sibling or grandparent."

 

 

To view the Arizona Public Record Statutes, visit: http://www.azleg.state.az.us/ars/39/title39.htm

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39-121.01. Definitions; copies; printouts or photographs of public records

D. Subject to the provisions of section 39-121.03:

1. Any person may request to examine or be furnished copies, printouts or photographs of any public record during regular office hours. The custodian of such records shall furnish such copies, printouts or photographs and may charge a fee if the facilities are available, except that public records for purposes listed in section 39-122 shall be furnished without charge.

2. If the custodian of a public record does not have facilities for making copies, printouts or photographs of a public record which a person has a right to inspect, such person shall be granted access to the public record for the purpose of making copies, printouts or photographs. The copies, printouts or photographs shall be made while the public record is in the possession, custody and control of the custodian thereof and shall be subject to the supervision of such custodian.
 


Uniform Crime Reporting - Definitions

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From "Crime in the United States," 1996 Uniform Crime Reports, U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation: "The Uniform Crime Reporting Program is a nationwide, cooperative statistical effort of more than 16,000 city, county and state law enforcement agencies voluntarily reporting data on crimes brought to their attention."

The offenses included are the violent crimes of murder and non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault and the property crimes of burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft and arson.
 

Part I - Violent
Violent Crime
Murder
Robbery
Forcible Rape
Aggravated Assault

 

Part I - Property
Property Crime
Arson
Burglary
Larceny-Theft
Vehicle Theft
 

Violent Crime
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Violent crime is composed of four offenses: murder and non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. All violent crimes involve force or threat of force.

Murder and Non negligent Manslaughter
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Murder and non-negligent manslaughter, as defined in the Uniform Crime Reporting Program, is the willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another.

Forcible Rape
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Forcible rape, as defined in the program, is the carnal knowledge of a female forcibly and against her will. Assaults or attempts to commit rape by force or threat of force also are included; however, statutory rape (without force) and other sex offenses are excluded.

Robbery
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Robbery is the taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.

Aggravated Assault
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Aggravated assault is an unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault is usually accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to produce death or great bodily harm. Attempts are included, since it is not necessary that an injury result when a gun, knife or other weapon is used, which could and probably would result in serious personal injury if the crime were successfully completed.

Property Crime
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Property crime includes the offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft and arson. The object of the theft-type offenses is the taking of money or property, but there is no force or threat of force against the victims. Arson is included, since it involves the destruction of property; its victims may be subjected to force.

Burglary
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The Uniform Crime Reporting Program defines burglary as the unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or theft. The use of force to gain entry is not required to classify an offense as burglary. Burglary in this program is categorized into three sub-classifications: forcible entry, unlawful entry where no force is used and attempted forcible entry.

Larceny-Theft
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Larceny-theft is the unlawful taking, carrying, leading or riding away of property from the possession or constructive possession of another. It's pocket picking, purse snatching, thefts from motor vehicles, thefts of motor vehicle parts and accessories, bicycle thefts, etc., in which no use of force, violence or fraud occurs. In the Uniform Crime Reporting Program, this crime category does not include embezzlement, confidence games, forgery and worthless checks.  Motor vehicle theft also is excluded from this category inasmuch as it is a separate Crime Index offense.

Motor Vehicle Theft
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Defined as the theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle, this offense category includes the stealing of automobiles, trucks, buses, motorcycles, motor scooters, snowmobiles, etc. The definition excludes the taking of a motor vehicle for temporary use by those persons having lawful access.

Arson
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Arson is defined by the Uniform Crime Reporting Program as any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, personal property of another, etc.

Only fires determined through investigation to have been willfully or maliciously set are classified as arsons. Fires of suspicious or unknown origins are excluded.